History Courses

1960 Art and Culture

Course Number: 

HSS118

This is an integrated arts/history/politics course about one of the most critical decades in United States history. We examine the 1960s, not just from a historical and political point of view, but also delve deeply into the cultures of the time period, primarily through the arts. There are extensive readings and intensive written assignments, including a substantial research paper, as well as arts-based projects.

Term(s): 

Fall

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

A-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed US History II

Ancient Greek and Roman History

Course Number: 

HSS129B

How did the Ancient Greco-Roman world help shape the world we live in today? Students will learn about Classical Greece over the first half of the semester. Topics will include the rivalry between Athens and Sparta, Greek art and culture during Pericles' golden age, famous Greek philosophers (including Socrates, Aristotle and Plato), and the conquests and legacy of Alexander the Great. The second half of the course will focus on Ancient Rome. Students will examine reasons behind the incredible rise and fall of Roman Republic as they learn about famous individuals including Hannibal, Cicero, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, and Caesar Augustus. Students will also explore the daily life, art, culture and achievements of Imperial Rome.

Term(s): 

Spring

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

F-Block

Ancient Greek and Roman History

Course Number: 

HSS129
How did the Ancient Greco-Roman world help shape the world we live in today? Students will learn about Classical Greece over the first half of the semester. Topics will include the rivalry between Athens and Sparta, Greek art and culture during Pericles' golden age, famous Greek philosophers (including Socrates, Aristotle and Plato), and the conquests and legacy of Alexander the Great. The second half of the course will focus on Ancient Rome. Students will examine reasons behind the incredible rise and fall of Roman Republic as they learn about famous individuals including Hannibal, Cicero, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, and Caesar Augustus. Students will also explore the daily life, art, culture and achievements of Imperial Rome.

Term(s): 

Fall

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

D-Block

Civil Liberties and Political Rights

Course Number: 

HSS122B

Study the U. S. Constitution and its protection of civil liberties by looking at controversies surrounding freedom of expression, freedom of religion, discrimination, and the rights of the accused. Students examine the idea of liberty as it has developed in the United States, and issues of rights and responsibilities in a 21st century democracy. We look at current controversies, such as the right of the government to search our cell phones, or sentencing guidelines for juveniles. Students present and defend their positions on constitutional issues and precedents in essays, a documented research paper, class discussions, panel presentations, debates, and a simulated hearing.

Term(s): 

Spring

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

B-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed US History II

Electoral Politics

Course Number: 

HSS126

This is a history/politics/civics course focusing on the electoral process, and its surrounding issues. We will examine the Constitution, looking at the function of the different branches of government and the various rights guaranteed by the Amendments. We will then investigate the Presidential electoral process, including: campaigning, election financing, the role of the media and the Electoral College. There will be extensive reading and writing assignments, including a substantial research paper, as well as debates and arts-based projects.

Term(s): 

Fall

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

C,H

Honors Globalization

Course Number: 

HSS128

This course explores the phenomenon known as Globalization, and its effects upon the economies, environments, and peoples of the world. Students will begin by learning about the historical events and forces that gave rise to the Global economy. We will then move on to investigate some of Globalization's key institutions and the ramifications of their policies - both good and bad - around the world. Students will then explore the effects of Globalization on First World/Third World relations, women and children, the environment, immigration and more. They will research various case studies before going on to learn about how people around the world are problem-solving and responding to Globalization's effects on their lives.

Term(s): 

Fall

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

F-Block

LGBTIQ

Course Number: 

HSS124

This course provides an introduction to the social, cultural, and political history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer people from different time periods and cultures. We focus on understanding categories of sexuality and historical developments with respect to sexual politics, policies, legislation, and the court system. We look at the emergence of homosexuality and heterosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the changing relationship between homosexuality and transgenderism; the development of diverse lesbian and gay subcultures and their representation in popular culture; religion; AIDS; and gay, anti-gay, feminist, and queer movements. This course includes historical and literary texts: essays, articles, poetry, drama, fiction, memoir, film, and art. We read, write, discuss, research, create, and perform. This course may be taken for History or English Language Arts credit.

Term(s): 

Fall

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

B-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed US History II

Medieval Studies

Course Number: 

HSS121B

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the Western Medieval world. Students in this course will learn about important people, events, institutions, art, architecture, and daily life during the Middle Ages (500 - 1500 CE). Topics of study will include the Fall of Rome, Monasticism, Charlemagne, King Arthur, the Vikings, the Byzantine Empire, the Norman Conquest, Knighthood, Robin Hood, Gothic Cathedrals, Magna Carta, the Crusades, and the Black Death.

Term(s): 

Spring

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

A-Block
D-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed US History II

US History I

Course Number: 

HIS119
The fall semester of United States History 1 introduces students to a variety of social and political events of 19th and 20th century America. We first review America's history from the period of the American Revolution up to the Age of Jackson period of the late 1820s. The course has a special emphasis on the foundations of our freedom and liberty. Students will 'be' the history through participatory activities. The spring semester introduces students to a variety of social and political events of 19th and 20th Century America. Students learn about America's history from the Age of Jackson through Reconstruction. Students explore the significance of slavery in American history throughout the course in a variety of ways including debates, discussions, and simulations.

Term(s): 

Fall

Grade Level: 

9

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

A-Block
B-Block
D-Block
G-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed Humanities 7/8

US History I

Course Number: 

HIS119B

The fall semester of United States History 1 introduces students to a variety of social and political events of 19th and 20th century America. We first review America's history from the period of the American Revolution up to the Age of Jackson period of the late 1820s. The course has a special emphasis on the foundations of our freedom and liberty. Students will 'be' the history through participatory activities. The spring semester introduces students to a variety of social and political events of 19th and 20th Century America. Students learn about America's history from the Age of Jackson through Reconstruction. Students explore the significance of slavery in American history throughout the course in a variety of ways including debates, discussions, and simulations.

Term(s): 

Spring

Grade Level: 

9

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

A-Block
B-Block
D-Block
G-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed Humanities 7/8

US History II

Course Number: 

HIS120
The fall semester of United States History 2 covers the period in American history from Reconstruction through the Roaring 20s. Emphasis is equally distributed through cultural, political, and economical perspectives, and various political and social viewpoints. Students learn about this time period through readings, writings, discussions, role-plays and simulations.

Term(s): 

Fall

Grade Level: 

10

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

A-Block
C-Block
F-Block
H-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed US History I

US History II

Course Number: 

HIS120B

The spring semester introduces students to a variety of social and political events of 20th century America. We begin our studies with a look at life during the Depression years and World War II, then turn our attention to the fabulous fifties and rebellious sixties, and end with a study on Vietnam and the Reagan years. Emphasis is equally distributed through cultural, political and economical perspectives and various political and social viewpoints. We use many different media to study this time frame. Unlike other time periods, this course allows for extensive use of oral history (guest speakers), television, Hollywood movies, newspaper footage, and musical recordings.

Term(s): 

Spring

Grade Level: 

10

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

A-Block
C-Block
F-Block
H-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed US History II Fall Semester

Wild, Wild West

Course Number: 

HSS112B

The American west often evokes images of Native Americans, gold miners, gamblers, trappers, mountain men, cowboys, cattle ranchers, and outlaws. This course explores the myths and realities of these wild west images, as well as how frontier myths have affected America's identity today. Special attention is given to the Native Americans and their place in America's history. Students are challenged to view American history from a variety of perspectives.

Term(s): 

Spring

Grade Level: 

11/12 Only

Credits: 

5.00

Blocks Offered: 

C-Block
H-Block

Pre-requisite: 

Must have passed US History II